Tree finder

Find trees by selecting the criteria you require from the list below, then view the matching results.

Tree categories

  • Our recommendations8
  • Albizia (Silk) trees4
  • Amelanchier - Juneberry1
  • Birch trees20
  • Crab-apple trees43
  • Flowering cherry trees70
    • Japanese flowering cherry trees23
  • Flowering dogwood trees5
  • Flowering pear trees3
  • Hawthorn trees7
  • Hazel bushes2
  • Hornbeam1
  • Japanese maple trees6
  • Liquidambar - Gum trees1
  • Magnolia4
  • Maple trees21
  • Rowan trees28
  • Whitebeam trees5
  • Fruiting ornamental trees3
  • Native trees3
  • Evergreen trees2

Stock availability this season

  • All217
  • In stock212
  • Not in stock5
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Growing

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    Attractive features

    • Attractive flowers123
    • Attractive fruit54
    • Attractive tree / plant60
    • Attractive bark37
    • Attractive foliage44
    • Autumn foliage colour108
    • Variegated foliage9
    • Scented flowers41
    • Scented foliage3
    • Seed heads / pods0
    • Winter colour7
    • Spring foliage colour1
    • Summer foliage colour1
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    Height 10 years

    The height after 10 years is one of the best ways to compare different tree species and varieties. The height of a tree will also determine how much space it will need, and how far the roots are likely to spread.

    • Up to 1.5m / 5ft5
    • 1.5m-2.5m / 5ft-8ft15
    • 2.5m-3.5m / 8ft-12ft69
    • 3m-5m / 10ft-16ft106
    • 5m-10m / 16ft-33ft6
    • Over 10m / 33ft0
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    Growth habit

    The way in which a tree grows is one of the most important characteristics to consider when choosing a new tree. Most trees grow with a more or less upright and gradually spreading form, but some grow in much more compact columnar style whilst others spread widely. The branches of weeping trees will cascade down from the crown.

    • Columnar / Fastigiate14
    • Upright53
    • Upright-spreading72
    • Spreading44
    • Weeping12
    • Climbing0
    • Sprawling0
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    Growth rate

    Most trees go through a juvenile stage when they grow quite quickly. Once they reach maturity after about 10 years, growth continues, but at a steadier pace. The growth rate gives an indication of how quickly the young tree will approach its mature size.

    • Fast29
    • Average87
    • Slow31
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    Vigour

    Within a species, different varieties may have a range of different vigours. The more vigorous the variety, the larger it is likely to get - relative to others of the same species. The situation is further complicated with fruit trees, which are usually grafted on size-controlling rootstocks.

    • Natural dwarf4
    • Weak growing6
    • Slightly small50
    • Average vigour85
    • Slightly large16
    • Vigorous10
    • Very vigorous0
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    Site conditions

    • Sheltered site20
    • Windy site11
    • Free-draining site18
    • Occasional flooding58
    • Occasional drought33
    • Coastal site38
    • Air pollution3
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    Sunlight

    • Prefers full sun59
    • Some shade17
    • Prefers shade0
    • Tolerates shade22
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    Useful for

    • Patio growing29
    • Topiary5
    • Hedging6
    • Wall training2
    • Screening2
    • Open spaces64
    • Small spaces62
    • Street / amenity41
    • Specimen planting43
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    Blossom duration

    Most tree blossom lasts for about 2-3 weeks, but some varieties flower over a longer or shorter period.

    • Short1
    • Average (2-3 weeks)55
    • Long30
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    Hardiness rating (RHS)

    The RHS cold-hardiness rating is specifically tailored to UK conditions. The scale runs from H1 (likely to require a heated greenhouse) to H7 (able to survive temperatures below -20C).

    • H1a0
    • H1b0
    • H1c0
    • H21
    • H3 (to -5C)1
    • H4 (to -10C)0
    • H5 (to -15C)5
    • H6 (to -20C)70
    • H7 (more than -20C)2
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    Pruning

    • Do not prune47
    • No need to prune0
    • Light prune84
    • Prune after flowering12
    • Prune hard13
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    Disease resistance

    • Good79
    • Average18
    • Poor4
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    Self-fertility

    This attribute applies mainly to fruit species such as apples. Fruit varieties that are not self-fertile will require a compatible pollinator of a different variety nearby. If in doubt, please contact us.

    • Self-fertile38
    • Partially self-fertile3
    • Not self-fertile0
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    Gardening skill

    • Suitable for beginners146
    • Average41
    • Some needed2
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Identification

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    Country of origin

    • Argentina0
    • Australia1
    • Belgium3
    • Canada3
    • China22
    • Czech Republic0
    • Denmark1
    • Estonia0
    • France2
    • Germany1
    • Ireland1
    • Italy1
    • Japan36
    • Kazakhstan0
    • Morocco0
    • Netherlands8
    • New Zealand4
    • Norway0
    • Russia3
    • Poland0
    • Portugal1
    • Serbia0
    • Slovakia0
    • Spain1
    • South Korea2
    • Sweden1
    • Switzerland0
    • Turkey0
    • Ukraine0
    • United Kingdom33
    • United States25
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    Flowering month

    • January2
    • February12
    • March19
    • April78
    • May58
    • June19
    • July4
    • August4
    • September1
    • October0
    • November1
    • December0
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    Flowering season

    • Early20
    • Mid-season36
    • Late15
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    Flower colour

    • White90
    • Pink - light25
    • Pink17
    • Pink - dark18
    • Red - dark2
    • Crimson5
    • Cream2
    • Yellow2
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    Flower form

    This attribute applies particularly to blossom trees, as to some extent the more petals a flower has the more intense the blossom display will be. However other characteristics such as colour, flower size, and shape all have an impact on the beauty of spring blossom. It is sometimes said that single-flower varieties are more attractive or easier for pollinating insects, but flowering season and availability of alternative food sources may explain this.

    • Single flower (5-8 petals)63
    • Semi-double flower (10-20 petals)14
    • Double flower (25-50 petals)21
    • Chrysanthemum flower (100+ petals)1
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    Flower size

    Flower size is ranked relative to other varieties within the same species.

    • Small17
    • Medium37
    • Large25
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    Leaf colour

    • Green169
    • Bronze18
    • Dark purple10
    • Grey-green5
    • Bluish-green2
    • Yellow1
    • Yellow-green3
    • Pink-white-green variegated2
    • White-green variegated1
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    Leaf colour - young

    The colour of newly-emerged leaves in spring is often different to the colour of mature summer leaves. It is also often a key feature of blossom trees, where the leaf colour will complement and contrast with the blossom colour.

    • Green81
    • Light copper30
    • Dark bronze11
    • Dark purple5
    • Grey-green6
    • Yellow-green3
    • Light red6
    • Orange1
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    Leaf colour - autumn

    Autumn is a time of spectacular leaf colour in many tree species, as the tree responds to shortening days and cooler temperatures.

    • Green23
    • Yellow23
    • Yellow / Crimson6
    • Orange / Gold20
    • Orange / Red41
    • Bronze / Purple9
    • Multiple tints44
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    Fruit colour

    • Black2
    • Blue - dark1
    • Bronze1
    • Brown2
    • Crimson0
    • Gold0
    • Green1
    • Green - light0
    • Green / Red1
    • Green / Yellow1
    • Orange2
    • Orange / Red14
    • Orange flush0
    • Pink10
    • Purple4
    • Purple - light0
    • Red22
    • Red - dark11
    • Red / Black2
    • Red / Green0
    • Red striped0
    • Russet1
    • Varigated0
    • Yellow8
    • Yellow / Orange4
    • Yellow / Red1
    • White3
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    Fruit size

    Fruit size is ranked relative to other varieties in the same category or species.

    • Very small8
    • Small21
    • Average10
    • Large6
    • Very large1
    • Variable0
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    Annual cycle

    • Deciduous207
    • Evergreen2
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    Awards

    The Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit (AGM) was established in the 1920s. It recognises plants which perform consistently and reliably in the typical UK garden situation. It is reviewed annually, The Award of Merit (AM) is different - it is given to plants which are of exhibition quality. The AGM in particular is a useful starting point when selecting plants, but be aware there are many excellent varieties which do not meet the specific criteria for the AGM.

    • RHS Award of Garden Merit89
    • RHS Award of Merit11
    • RHS 1st class0
    • Slow Food - Ark of Taste0
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    Bark

    • White13
    • Grey1
    • Brown - light4
    • Brown - chocolate2
    • Brown / Red2
    • Copper / Purple1
    • Striated - brown4
    • Striated - red2
    • Peeling3
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Using

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    Fruit persistence

    Persistent fruits will hang on the tree into late autumn, and are a good source of food for wildlife, as well as providing autumn colour in the garden.

    • Normal ripening8
    • Fruit drops when ripe3
    • Ripens over a period8
    • Persistent42
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    Wildlife

    The RHS "perfect for pollinators" initiative identifies plants that are particularly attractive to pollinating insects.

    • Attractive to birds75
    • RHS perfect for pollinators49